The most crucial game is known to be “Chess”, which is going on pretty well around the world. The worldwide championship is going on right now in Saudi Arabia under “The King Salman World Blitz & Rapid Championship 2017” in Riyadh. More than 200 players from 70 countries are participating in the World Rapid and Blitz Chess Championships. And it held under King Salman bin Abdulaziz.

KING SALMAN WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2017

It seems that this tournament has actually hurt most of the great players emotionally. Because it was heard from the FIDE vice president that almost seven have been denied visas to participate. And few others quit intentionally, just because of Saudi Arabia’s discriminatory laws for women which are against women, according to them.

Ukraine’s world chess champion Anna Muzychukboycotted for participating in Chess Championship because it was going to be held in Saudi Arabia. She is a Ukrainian chess grandmaster, played for Slovenia from 2004-2014. She learned to play chess at the age of two by her parents and played her first tournament at the age of five and in the same year, she placed second in the under-10 girl’s championship of Lviv Oblast.

Anna Muzychuk (center) won two gold medals in FIDE World Rapid Championship, Doha

She won the Women’s World Rapid Championship in 2016 and the Women’s World Blitz Chess Championship twice, in 2014 & 2016.

She refused to participate by saying the “woman who goes outside have to wear abaya or hijab and also she cannot go alone. She should always be accompanied by a man. All these things are a little bit strange to me”. She previously played in IRAN, wearing a scarf. Her problem is actually with Saudi’s law, which hinders women from traveling without a guardian.

Anna Muzychuk playing in Iran

Refusing this Championship cost her to lose two world champion titles and a chance to win $250,000.

She also said that there are people who will support her decision and condemn her too. On the other hand, the organization had to make a code dress for the Championship.

This year Saudis ended a ban on women’s driving in September but their guardianship rule still sticks there, which is, women need guardian’s approval for a decision on issues like marriage, travel plans, education or employment.